3 Giving Your H5P Questions to CALI

You should place your H5P questions where you want them to appear in the draft of your book that you provide to CALI. In other words, please do not provide a separate file with just the H5P questions. For every H5P question, you should include:

  1. H5P;
  2. The question type (Multiple Choice, True/False, etc.); and
  3. The question heading (Check Your Understanding; Expand on Your Understanding, etc.)
  4. The question(s) presented; the answer choices (if applicable); the [right] answer; and feedback (if applicable).

You will learn more about the different questions types – and what you should provide for each one – in the next section.

Example:

H5P Multiple Choice – Check your Understanding

Question: Summary judgment exists primarily for the purposes of:

A. Making the jury’s role more significant

Incorrect. If anything, summary judgment minimizes the jury’s role and is subject to critique by some on those grounds.

C is the correct answer. Summary judgment exists to streamline litigation and allow parties to resolve legal questions without trial or (in some cases, such as in Rodriguez) before trial, so that only certain questions go before the jury.

B. Shifting the burden to the defendant on issues of fact

Incorrect. There is no burden shifting in summary judgment motions, necessarily; the parties may cross-move for summary judgment, but it is only on issues where there are no remaining “genuine issues of material fact.” Hence the last part is also incorrect on those grounds.

C is the correct answer. Summary judgment exists to streamline litigation and allow parties to resolve legal questions without trial or (in some cases, such as in Rodriguez) before trial, so that only certain questions go before the jury.

C. Streamlining litigation and allowing parties to resolve legal questions without (or before) trial

Correct. Summary judgment exists to streamline litigation and allow parties to resolve legal questions without trial or (in some cases, such as in Rodriguez) before trial, so that only certain questions go before the jury.

D. Flushing out information so that the parties can determine whether they have plausible claims

Incorrect. Summary judgment is too late a point at which parties would be assessing the plausibility of their claims; this happens at a pleading stage. You didn’t need to know that last part, however (which you could say is a civil procedure type of concern or inquiry). You just needed to be able to rule out the use of summary judgment as a mechanism for flushing out information. RIL is such a mechanism, and you’ve learned all sorts of reasons (and ways) in which it might be used to do so. Summary judgment is a form of ending, or streamlining, litigation, resolving issues as a matter of law without involving costly and time-intensive determination of facts (or if it is a motion for partial summary judgment, by minimizing fact-intensive inquiries and leaving for trial only the ones that are genuinely raising issues of material fact).

C is the correct answer. Summary judgment exists to streamline litigation and allow parties to resolve legal questions without trial or (in some cases, such as in Rodriguez) before trial, so that only certain questions go before the jury.

Next, we’ll look at the different ways you can structure feedback for multiple-choice questions.

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